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Label moving boxes like a boss.

The key to finding your stuff easily is labeling all your packed boxes accurately and clearly. When you’re stacking boxes in a van or car you won’t be able to see their tops, so make sure you label the sides as well. But don’t stop there.

Label the boxes by category and by room (for example, BooksLibrary and BooksBedroom) to speed up the unloading process.

If you’re more of a visual learner, use color-coded electrical tape to label your boxes.

Use small boxes for heavy items.

It sounds obvious, but if you’ve ever known the struggle that is carrying a large cardboard box stuffed full of college textbooks across a parking lot, then you also know this advice cannot be overstated.

Fill your small boxes with heavier items and use large boxes for light things like decorative pillows, towels, and linens

Use packing tape.

Not to be confused with duct tape, packing tape is the heavy-duty, insanely sticky clear tape you see at the post office.

Always make sure your boxes have tops, but don’t do the interlocking fold method with the flaps of your box tops — just tape them closed. It’s much more secure this way.

Protect fragile items with packing paper, bubble wrap, or blankets.

Use packing paper to pad all your fragile dishware and decorative items. Stuff it inside glasses, wrap it around vases and bowls, and shove it between your dishes and the side of your boxes.

Make sure you wrap each of your fragile items separately, so they’re fully cushioned. If you don’t have packing paper, opt for bubble wrap or a quilted blanket.

Pack dishes vertically.

Don’t stack your dishes horizontally inside a box. Instead, wrap your plates and bowls in packing paper, gently place them into a box on their sides like records, and then fill the empty spaces with bubble wrap to prevent cracking and breaking.

Cover the tops of toiletry bottles with Saran Wrap.

To prevent potential leaking and spilling (and crying and cursing), take an extra two minutes as you pack to secure your toiletry bottles.

Unscrew the cap of your shampoo bottle, wrap a piece of Saran Wrap (or a Ziploc bag) over the top, and screw the cap back on. Simple and surprisingly effective.

Pack a clear plastic box with things you’ll need right away.

This can include toilet paper, a shower curtain, hand soap, towels, sheets, snacks, or whatever else you think you’ll need for the first day or night in your new home.

Having a few essential items on hand will make you feel more comfortable and prepared to tackle unpacking everything else.

Pack a personal overnight bag.

Chances are you won’t get everything unpacked on the first day, so bring whatever you need to feel relaxed and settled on your first night.

A change of clothes, your toiletries, a water bottle, and your laptop can go a long way in making your new place feel more like home.

Stop buying groceries a week before you leave.

To save you the guilt of throwing away perfectly decent food, stop buying groceries a week or two before you’re scheduled to move. Try to make meals at home to use all the food you have left.

If you don’t finish everything, invite a friend or two over to see if they need some half-finished spices or boxes of pasta.

For anything you can’t get rid of, toss it and don’t look back.

Take pictures of your electronics.

Before you take them apart and pack them up, take a few pictures of the back of your electronic devices — the cord situations, if you will.

Having these pictures will make it that much easier to set up your TV or monitor as soon as you move in — no fretting necessary.

Put your storage bins and luggage to use.

Instead of trying to figure out how to pack up all your woven seagrass baskets, linen bins, and carry-on suitcases, store stuff inside them.

Think clothes and shoes for sturdy suitcases, and hand towels and pillowcases for lightweight, open-top bins and baskets.

Make copies of important papers.

Pack a separate box or briefcase with copies of all your important documents in case of an emergency.

Though it might be a tedious project to scan or copy every birth certificate, passport, social security card, proof of insurance paper, and tax claim, you don’t want to risk damaging the only version of your papers in transit. They’re too precious.

Set aside cleaning supplies for moving day.

Build a mini-cleanup kit so you can do one final sweep through your home on moving day.

Set aside a broom, mop, dustpan, duster, sponge, cleaning products, paper towels, and old rags for wiping the grimy, hidden surfaces you could never get to when all your stuff was in the way.

Load boxes from the same rooms together.

Stack and load boxes in groups according to the rooms indicated on the labels. Put all the kitchen stuff together, all the bedroom stuff together, and all the living room stuff together.

That way, you can unload all the boxes from the same rooms at the same time, which makes unpacking everything a cinch.

Load heavy furniture into the moving truck first.

Have the person with the highest Tetris score be in charge of figuring out how to fit everything in the back of the moving truck in the most efficient way possible.

Load your heavy furniture first, like sofas and sectionals. Then finish with lighter items.

Be gentle with everything, as most seemingly wooden items are not actually made from wood, but particle board.

Don’t be afraid to flip things over, either — couches actually transport well on their sides and save a ton of space in the process.

Delegate tasks when you’re unloading the moving truck.

Figure out ahead of time who will be the chief of moving day. Whoever feels comfortable taking charge of the unloading and organization process (and inevitably answering 400 different questions) should assume this position.

Delegate every little task so no one is wasting time or sitting around with nothing to do. With all hands on deck, your unpacking process will fly by.

Keep Ziploc bags handy.

Keep a stash of Ziploc bags in your purse or backpack for the big moving day. You can use the bags to store doorknobs, tiny screws and brackets, luggage keys, or other small, easily forgettable items.

Make the beds first.

Making your beds as soon as you move in eliminates the of worry about tucking in your dust ruffle, or finding the right set of sheets at the end of a long night, you can just crash out right away.

Be a good host.

Make sure you take care of the people who help you move, regardless of whether or not they’re being paid to do it.

Provide beverages and snacks for everyone, break for pizza, or pay for  everyone’s dinner and get it delivered